MovieTalk: video suggestions

If you have found good videos for MT, please comment here. We need the paper airplane one, and any others you’ve found.

Alma has been a favorite.

The video JS showed in our group is called “Love Recipe.” You can find it on YouTube.

For a very short one, look for “Cat gets caught barking…”

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38 responses to “MovieTalk: video suggestions

  1. theeducationrevolution

    Mamá – Guillermo del Toro (caution very scary!)

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  2. Hola! I use very successfully the original silent animations from the 1920s. Winsor McCay’s for example are fantastic!

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  3. For French, search French Toast Animation. You could use it for other languages too, but it has a few lines of mumbly French dialogue.

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  4. I used the 2013 Superbowl Budweiser commercial with my adult ESL class. Don’t know if using a beer commercial would be okay in K-12, though. BTW, thanks for all your posts. You are a constant inspiration!

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  5. Haven’t used this one yet, but I plan to — Fresh Guacamole by Pes from the Academy Award short film nominations.

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  6. Wow! These are great! Thanks to all…and keep ’em coming! I’m going to leave this post up top for a couple days unless something truly amazing happens in class (like my adult intermediates last night asking for more MovieTalk…they LOVED Masha and the bear!) As it turns out, the French teacher reported using that for her French classes…the one where spring comes and the bear meets a lovely bear lady. If you’re looking, find Masha i medved.

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  7. Here are my 2 cents
    1) http://www.filmsshort.com – I have not used this one but there’s sure something to find there for everyone
    2) http://www.topito.com/top-courts-metrage-pixar – first shorts by Pixar – just found it (thanks, Twitter!)
    3) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=316AzLYfAzw – my personal favorite: I introduced past tense with it last year and milked it for a week!
    4) This blog has tons of ideas about videos http://palmyraspanish1.blogspot.com

    I suppose, I can try Masha too:)

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  8. This is the “Prom” commercial from Audi http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ANhmS6QLd5Q
    Doritos “Goat For Sale” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4d8ZDSyFS2g
    Doritos w/Jose’s cousin http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HvyAlEfnoYg
    Love this!! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OAlyHUWjNjE
    This one is is Greek w/ English subtitles but has potential! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vDVawKB1FwY

    And anyone who teaches English (or who needs a lift!) should watch this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7knUFWY2P44

    I have others at school..

    with love,
    Laurie

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  9. Here is a great selection of mostly short wordless videos collected by an AIM French teacher. The majority (there are 90) can be used for any language.

    I teach English and have used some of the videos on Kieran Donaghy’s Film-English site. Some are wordless. Just ignore his lesson plans.
    http://film-english.com/
    My primary school kids especially like Happy Food.

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  10. It looks like my first link didn’t work. Search for Sylvia Duckworth on YouTube then go to her collection “Animations sans mots (no words)”.

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  11. You all ROCK!! There are enough here for us to use for the rest of the year already! But don’t let that hold you back when you find new ones. These might just help get my kids through to spring break (starts Friday for them, Monday for us).

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  12. Here’s another one. It will give you links to all the Masha and Bear series.

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  13. Dori Vittetoe

    Hi Michele! My department is thinking about trying MovieTalk with our middle schoolers. Do you have a video of you using MovieTalk that we could watch to give us some ideas (and courage)?

    Merci!

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    • Hi Dori! I wish I did have one. I’m about to start presenting this in a few places, so maybe I’ll ask folks to film me and if it “works” that day, I’ll post it or something. Truly, you should just try it. Pick one of the short clips. Play it through without sound or with sound, especially if it’s wordless…maybe not playing the ending, if that is going to be a surprise. Then re-play it, stopping the video to talk about anything that strikes your fancy. Describe the scene, what the person is doing, what is happening on the street around, and so on. Ask circling questions after you’ve done that, ask prediction questions if they fit, ask who likes the green hair or the tiny dog. I am constantly amazed by how much my kids pick up through these little videos! You can do it! Try it, and report back. Go for a maximum of ten minutes, and then revert to your regular activities.

      (That sounds like what we tell people to do with TPRS, doesn’t it? Try it for just a few minutes, and then go back to traditional teaching. But this is TPRS plus. MTPRS!)

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      • dori vittetoe

        Okay, you convinced me–exactly how Susie Gross convinced me to try TPRS when I was too nervous. Tuesday morning with my 8th graders, who need a change of pace anyway! I’ll report back and let you know how it goes. Thanks for replying and for the encouragement!

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  14. I’m smiling hard! Can’t wait to hear the results.

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  15. So…by the way, it looks as though I’m going to do a MT presentation in Bend, and maybe one in Seattle in May. I’m excited!! If anyone lives in either of those two places and wants to come, I’ll send you contact info or plain info. I would love to have people come who would be pre-approving.

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    • Michele,
      I’m an hour or so (depending on traffic) away from Seattle. Would love to see you and your MT presentation there. Please do send info when you can. Thanks

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      • It would be SO much fun to see you!! Now Seattle hasn’t written me back, but you will be the second to know (after Karl) if and when they get things figured out.

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  16. Here’s the video of the boy kicking the can and the harm it causes, from Bess Hayles’ blog, where she quotes Laurie’s use of the video…

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  17. Love this! You can do both future (before viewing, have the kids imagine a sequence of what the can is going to damage) or even conditional (if he kicked the can, it would…) and past (what actually happened), writing a morale and supporting it with the events from the movie! Now the question is what type of assessment would I do after something like this. How and what should we assess after the Movie Talk? Obviously, listening input (like match the pic with verbal description read by teacher) any other suggestions?

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    • I was about to say that I haven’t done any assessment attached to MT, and realized that I did one … today! I just said T/F statements, and they did an eyes-closed, raise hands if true, keep hands down if false quiz. Only four kids missed any (I just jot down the ones that miss and do anywhere from five to ten statements). Actually the entire group missed a couple, so I didn’t count those.

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  18. Hey Michele,

    This is such a wonderful resource. Thank you. I shared on Ben’s blog (most probably saw it or are familiar with them already, but Dennis Gallagher shared with our Maine peer coaching group how to do movie talk and he used the short/silent Simon’s cat videos. There are many of them. He used this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1qHVVbYG8Y If you just google Simon’s cat many come up…

    Cant wait to see you in Dallas!

    Skip

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    • Skip, these are absolutely hysterical! I love them! Thank you so much for posting this set of cartoons. I’ve just … um … not wasted, but spent some time checking out several of them and laughing! What a great mind. Obviously has a cat.

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      • Oh, and PS: I can’t wait either! If you can come to the MT presentation, I will want to pick your brain about what to add/subtract, since you’ve been to another one. Of course, having done one means that you probably don’t need to do another! Maybe we can talk separately.

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  19. I will definitely plan to attend your MT session. I think it would be very useful to compare what you do with what Dennis did…

    Also, I can’t remember if you will be sharing your session on scaffolding reading again? I would love to have another shot at getting that technique since I will be teaching a Spanish 3/4 class next year…
    Again, I am so thankful to have all of the MT movie suggestions all in one place…

    See you soon!
    Skip

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    • I won’t be doing Scaffolding Literacy as a presentation again (though I wish I could; I’ve improved it!), but I’d be delighted to sit down with you and go over the main pieces, or do a mini demo and then work through something with you a couple days later. I love SL! In the meantime, you might already have noticed that there’s a category here for that with a lot of links to the “real,” Down Under, sites.

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  20. I remember this one (El Montruo del armario) being posted somewhere by someone (don’t think I saw it above?) It is not completely silent, but it would expose students to cortometrajes… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aqTpsG5ifec

    It too is scary! 🙂

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    • Mary Beth Tietgens

      Michelle – even though I experienced the Movie Talk session at our 1/2 day Maine get together, I, too, will be attending your MT session! Dennis did a great job, and he referenced your website all the time, so it would be great to see what you do, and hear from others attending the session (if there’s time) as to what THEY do — gosh there are so many people to learn from!!! Thank you ALL so much!

      ~~MB

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      • Mary Beth, you are so right! It is possible to keep learning and learning forever. I was actually just thinking about this…I am happy that there is always more to learn, but it would be really nice to think that I was a complete authority about just one thing! On the other hand, that could be sad!

        I’m glad you’re planning to be there, and I’ll count on your addition to the conversation!

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  21. Thanks to Diane N:

    This is a silent, 10-minute Chinese cartoon about a tall wife and her short husband. Very simple animation – it’d be easy to add narration in class. (It’s quite tragic – various people try to change them, and its ending is sad and disappointing.): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAZpIvpC88U

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  22. I just discovered this one yesterday via a friend on FB. It’s a 1960s French silent film that I plan to use in conjunction with The Red Balloon in my adult ESL class. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q_mxdsfQxRo

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  23. Brand new to TPRS and I saw your Movietalk presentation in Dallas this summer and loved it! My question is what are some ways to use MT with native speakers? I have a class of 25 Spanish speakers with varying levels of reading & writing proficiency, I also have reluctant speakers because of the varying speaking proficiencies too.

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    • Hi Cathy! I’m so glad you liked the presentation. MovieTalk is actually directed at students who are below about Intermediate Low/Mid in Listening. That is probably not your target group in a native speaker class. You’d probably be better off using a movie as I might in an English class: that is, making sure that it fits a theme that you are already reading and writing about. You might want to go to the FocalSkills website to look at the other ideas that Ashley Hastings suggests. I really like his suggestions on correcting writing. I’ve been using those to great effect in my reluctant readers class.
      http://focalskills.info/about-fs/comprehensible-input.html

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