Monthly Archives: May 2018

Communicating with Mirrors

As I think ahead to the summer, I’m hoping that I can help new audiences understand teaching with CI.

Words in Alan Alda’s book If I Understood You, Would I Have This Look On My Face? are jumping out at me – literally, as I’m listening to it rather than reading to it.

For storytelling teachers, there is one idea that is obvious: that people will learn better if they have a story to attach it to. But Alda has a new lens for me to use as I discuss how slow is slow enough for language acquisition.

Alda discusses teaching scientists how to share information better through improvisation exercises. One of those is the Mirror exercise. The follower in a pair must mirror the movements of the leader at the same time. Alda coaches the participants, telling them to slow down so that they can be precise together. If the leader is moving too fast, Alda says it’s his responsibility to help the mirror (follower) keep up with him.

“The person communicating something is responsible for how well the other person follows him. If I’m explaining something and you don’t follow me, it’s not simply your job to catch up. It’s my job to slow down. This is at the heart of communicating.”

“If I tell you something without making sure you got it, did I really communicate anything? Was I talking to you, or was I just making noises?”

Mirroring moves in ever more difficult exercises in movement into speech. The pairs have to use signals from body movement and ideas and face to work together.

Any of you who are around me this summer: I’m going to be drafting you into experiments with mirroring and improv games. With luck, it will make at least me a better communicator and teacher.

 

 

 

PS Alda cites this article on tapping by Valdesolo and Desteno as leading to social cohesion. I suspect it is part of what might start to explain the miracles Gerry Wass and I have noted happening in classrooms where we use music.

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