Daily Archives: February 1, 2019

Blissfully teaching

I am not sure, like the kids in The Sound of Music, what I did to deserve my current teaching situations, but I’m loving them. Granted, it’s been a tough week because I realized a big thing that I was doing wrong (thanks to a tactful observer), but it feels like this train is back on track to improving and connecting.

What the observer pointed out was that I seemed to have lost sight of what the point was during lessons in her room. Immediately, it was clear the same thing was happening everywhere. There’s so much material that it was flying at the students (from K-Uni) and it wasn’t ever going to be clear what was sticking.

As a CI teacher who had complete control over a mixed-level program in high and middle school, I had been used to picking a theme with the interests of kids in mind and following them down a path until we felt we’d “arrived,” whatever that meant in each group. But with a new language in elementary school (and the unlimited materials that exist in Spanish, even if I do stick to only one of my beloved resources) and a couple of new university Russian textbooks, with the overload of information in them, I was grabbing and flinging.

I used to purely follow kids’ ideas (and IB/AP themes) for lessons. By trying to answer questions and include their interests, themes would emerge for planning. When I asked myself what these new students might want and need to get out of the lessons, lessons fell into place. I knew what was worth doing and could stop flinging. Instead of drilling verbs of motion and case endings at the university, we discussed who wanted to go/travel/move where, with lots of support and with the idea that we were looking for surprising information about classmates who thought they knew one another. We did learn some surprising information: one student wanted to go get a glass of wine after class (tough day), another wants to move to Australia (farther from Mom), and another would like to move to the east coast of the US (even without ever having been there). Plenty of opportunity for me to increase the input including verbs of motion and accusative case. Lovely.

And really, it turns out that my Star of the Day questionnaire eventually covers everything that the textbook does. So when we needed to talk about food in the lower-level class, it was easy to hone in on that part of the questionnaire with our Star, personalizing with specific questions for him. (Sheer luck for me: he turned out to have formerly been a chef at one of our better local restaurants!) After talking, I projected the “class notes” document to add information about him, and students remembered information and reminded me with about specifics.

How long have I been teaching? Why did I need to relearn? I guess the answers don’t really matter.

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