Monthly Archives: February 2020

What’s working

Laurie Clarcq tells us to go with what works, concentrating on our strengths. It’s hard to do sometimes, but right now I’m feeling pretty good about a few things.

First, I had a really fun time doing a webinar for Voces Digital last week, and people have been enthusiastic about changes and tweaks that they’ve made. A local teacher called me up to tell me what a game-changer starting with the name questions was: she has a student from Ethiopia, and her class learned who in his culture names the child, who gives nicknames, and many other tantalizing facts that had the class on the edge of their chairs.

Second, I’m realizing that my version of story listening techniques work really well with my kindergarteners. It seems as though the older my students are, the less they enjoy the gentle confusion they might experience when not understanding every word. My kindergarteners, on the other hand, settle right in to storybook demeanor, lying on the floor or propped on their elbows, suggesting how the story might go, and commenting on what is lacking in my drawings. (Yesterday it was “El papá no tiene piernas.”) Yeah. I had drawn bobble-head bear heads. They wanted complete bodies.

Third, I’m having a fun time sharing a playlist of Russian YouTube videos. I posted on FB, hoping someone would know which person it was who wanted Russian class videos. That got shared on the Russian TPRS page, and a lot of Russian teachers seem to be appreciating the videos. In the past, Russian teachers have not been very complimentary (to say the least) about the one video that our school district posted. I’ve tried to explain, but the comments keep flowing in. Having an unlisted but accessible playlist seems to be the way to go, because only those who want it and have access through CI portals can get there.

In those Russian classes, I started right off with practices that might have scared off some of my attendees. We act out folk tales, they stand up and move to songs, and now the big hit: they are drawing up stories that they created so that we can talk about them and read them. Even though they are older adults, they are completely open to these activities and talk a lot about how much fun it is to be in this kind of language class. They make me want to teach them more and more.

In another series of Russian classes, also for adults, I realized anew how powerful it is to write with classes. We had interviewed a guest last week, and I explained to the group that I had forgotten everything he told us. I said I’d be embarrassed if he came back and I didn’t remember any details. So we reconstructed the interview. They remembered a lot. I typed it up on the screen for them. I compared what he had said (where he was born, what sports he liked, what instruments he played) to everyone else in the class. One guy walking out commented on how powerful it is to see the words in sentences they comprehend as we’re talking. (I love having adults for this reason. They recognize what makes a difference.) And the guy who was brand-new to class last night was able to hang in there, even though he admitted to being a little overwhelmed by the flow of Russian.

Other things are fun too…I can’t wait to try everything in Wooly Week and hope to apply to my Russian lessons somehow, though the WW plans are so thorough and creator-heavy that it will be an interesting challenge.