Monthly Archives: April 2020

We’re all in this together…

… and I’m so relieved by our stretchy communities, as well as being overwhelmed.

I’ve learned a few things about teaching with CI online. One is that it works. But I’ve also learned that, with kids, you have to be faster than they are. Figure out how to keep them on their toes. And you have to figure out how to keep yourself from being run over by the possibilities. I started to make a list of the people whose resources I have been collecting for both Russian and Spanish, and I just couldn’t, because I would certainly leave someone out.

I have learned that simpler is better, and that if we can find a way to laugh together, that makes it all easier. My Russian class laughed all the way through class today, and I got so much energy from them that I am still writing and reading.

I’ve learned how important it is to power myself with good food, good tea, exercise, and visits with friends, ideally visual ones. And then, as so many have said, to give myself a break when I think I’m not doing enough.

And speaking of not doing enough, I am going to answer a question Nicole asked today. How did I come to be teaching Spanish?

About four years ago, a community college prof came up after a presentation in Oregon. He asked whether I would come teach for his summer immersion program. I was delighted! I had just been cut loose from my 30-odd years of teaching high school Russian, and it felt like a wonderful chance. But then he said he wanted me for Spanish. He said it didn’t matter if I didn’t know Spanish well. (I knew about six words.) He said it was a grammar-based program, with a book I could easily follow. I was baffled by what he clearly didn’t understand about my methods, but took on a small group at my new tech school to teach while I considered the idea. I used Bryce Hedstrom’s La Llorona. I followed a very strict program of creating parallel stories with the class, based on my growing vocabulary of about 30 words. I questioned students like crazy. By the time we had finished the story, a guy who’d poo-poohed the idea of a non-speaker teaching a Spanish class came in for the day. After class, another student reported that he’d asked her how in the world my group could be so far ahead of his 102 Spanish class. That report gave me the confidence to take the summer job.

I had a great time that first summer, though I felt like a fraud from beginning to end, fearing every potential encounter with regular faculty members. They all must have thought I had a weak bladder, as every time one approached me, I had the sudden need to dash away. In the meantime, folks like Anny Ewing were correcting the stories my class wrote, and Martina Bex was sending me story scripts. I had a lot of help! The one thing I couldn’t do was decipher the grammar booklet. We’d open it occasionally and I’d find something that made sense, but it was under the guise of “I’m stealth-teaching you grammar. Ask me questions if you don’t understand something.” They didn’t ask. And I got rehired for the next year.

That fall, Mira Canion sent me a box of about 30 books, and Carol and Pat Gaab supplied me with about 25 more, so I read a lot. I watched movies and listened to podcasts and videos (Pablo Pancun Roman!) and news channels.

The next summer, Laurie Clarcq joined the summer CC faculty, and her support meant that I could hear what the words were supposed to sound like in real conversation. Laurie saved me by taking over when a bunch of Spanish teachers showed up for a beginning class on jokes, and when I was reading the wonderful Juliana with a group of supposed beginners, she swooped in and took the advanced folks. She also stepped in when the Spanish department head came in to hear an embedded reading. She never blew my cover. Alina sent me to Alice Ayel, so I got some real Spanish lessons from an expert CI storyteller. (Again, I shouldn’t even start mentioning people, as just about all the gurus in the world came to my aid at some point.)

Then I retired suddenly. I thought my world was ending. I don’t know anything but teaching. And I love this vocation. There is almost nothing better than connecting with people while watching them also magically acquire a language. And as I discovered, acquiring language (Spanish, in my case) gives a person a sense of confidence, of power.

That August, a local independent school somehow figured out that I had been teaching summer program Spanish at a CC, and they hired me based on the fact that I had trained their current teacher in the method that everyone loved. I argued with the administration for close to an hour that I was absolutely the wrong person for their K-5 program, and got them to promise that they would let me go as soon as they found a better applicant.

I spent my first semester dashing into closets, the copy room, even the boys’ bathroom once, when Spanish-speaking families came around on tours. Fast-forward to now, in my second year of truly speaking and teaching Spanish, and I’m giving lessons online to children, some of whom speak better Spanish than I do. Oh well. Can’t do anything about it. I can’t care about what they think…just keep on keeping on and doing my very best!

If the world were a normal place, I’d be going back to teach for my fourth summer at my now beloved community college. The world isn’t a normal place, so I probably won’t be…but I keep learning more Spanish, so in this isolating time I get to see my little ones’ faces and laugh with my Russian students about stories involving Baba Yaga and Karl Marx. I’m grateful for Zoom and for those who are generously sharing their materials, and for my family, home, friends and colleagues.

Thanks so much everyone, for what you do to make our communities stretch out to cover many needs. We’re going to have to extend further than we ever thought we could. But we can do it. Hugs to you all.