Monthly Archives: August 2020

Back to school, slowly

Teachers are back to school this week in our district, and I’m happy to be the beneficiary of three different conferences where I honed my online skills and picked up new ways to repeat readings and stories.

But this morning, what I’m chortling over is having been amazed again by the truth of the Slow Rule. Laurie Clarcq says, “Go slowly to go faster.” I do listen to her. I know she’s right. But until I really do it, I forget that it is true. I’m sure I’ve written about this here before. And will do in the future!

I have two online students who have recently jumped from needing a lot of support to being able to retain and produce language, rather the way that our raspberry bushes, having had what seemed a slow start, are burgeoning with red jewels. They grow, grow, grow, and suddenly there is a rich crop to harvest. This morning, one student came up with a story that ended up using almost all of the vocabulary that I was planning to introduce for a reading. We asked the story (“Traditional TPRS”), then I wrote it out with him (“Write and Discuss”), and then I started pre-telling the reading…and boom! There was all the same vocabulary, even though I hadn’t guided him to use it. He came up with it, seemingly by osmosis. He’s got the noun endings, and the past tense forms. I’m in awe of the human brain. And in the power of Slow.

As I head into teaching my groups of young children, I hope that I can remember that even if I have to start very slowly to bring in the newbies, it is worth it for everyone to move more slowly than seems necessary.

Going slowly is important for setting classroom expectations too. Usually I go over those too briefly, but having watched a bunch of demo lessons this summer, I can see that the best teachers keep asking students how they are to respond, modeling, repeating the expectations, noticing the students who remember them, and asking-modeling-repeating-noticing again! Going slowly works.