Monthly Archives: October 2020

I want my cards back!

How many people are like me, old enough to have used the card system for writing extensive papers in high school and college? I used to have stacks of cards for any paper longer than two pages. One set was for the resources. I would label each one with the correct MLA/AMA form and number it. As I took notes, I would label another set with the resource number, the topic of those notes, and the order of the cards with the specific notes. When it came time to write, I put all the cards with notes into order by topic, and was thus able to see whether I had support from several resources on a topic (and could thus claim it was common domain) or whether I needed to credit the information to a resource or two. I could re-order the cards so that the information would flow as I wrote. Sometimes I’d write the whole thing out by hand, and only then type it up … on a typewriter!

As much as I love my laptop and word processing, I wonder how many writers are still writing their manuscripts by hand. My little book is really just a long story that is going to be a bit thick in print because it will have illustrations and an extensive glossary. But even so, I couldn’t keep track of what I’d said in one part and how it flowed to the next. I have been wishing for the card system. In fact, if I ever write another book (no, Cindy, definitely not happening soon!), I want to come up with a card system to keep track of the chapters or themes or something. What I had to do the other day was print most of it out, lay it all over my floor, cut it into sections, then crawl among the pieces, labeling what they were before crossing pieces out and cutting even more apart to move them into new places. I compared them to the 40 or so sticky notes that I had with comments on them for changes or improvements, scribbled on the pages whatever I’d forgotten, taped them together in a new order, and went back to the computer in despair that I could ever fix it.

I still have twelve sticky notes next to me as I write. Some are reminders to go back to the real story and read up on what truly happened with the artists, and some are notes I couldn’t make sense of while crawling around on the floor. But hurrah! My kind, surely exhausted, editor reread and said that I made it flow. Her words: “I read it in one breath.” Well, “Я прочитала на одном дыхании,” to be exact.

I’m so relieved. I was thinking it was going to be another couple months just tweaking the writing. And it may. But I feel a lot better. Authors out there: what systems exist for writing efficiently that don’t involve printing out entire manuscripts?

Writing: just the first step

Who knew how much work it would be to get a little Russian book off my computer and into the world? The answer: Annie Ewing, for one, every other author in the world, and Mike Peto, my writing group teacher, who never tried to scare us with the giant wall we were facing as we started writing.

It is with great joy that I can announce I’ve mostly finished producing a manuscript in 19 or 20 short chapters. But next, as I heard from Annie at iFLT 2019, there are many steps to follow. Right now, I’m in several steps at once. I have read the book in its entirety with a few students. I have read parts of it with beginning groups. A couple of dear friends have shared the entire text with single students, and one has taught a whole class with it.

A talented editor has worked through about the first half for me, making suggestions I could never have come up with on my own. She asked me to think about the purpose of every section. It’s hard to do. She made suggestions, but in the end, I have to look at the purpose and the piece, and make sure that they match. Can you hear my internal dialogue, asking why I have to do this? I didn’t know I was this lazy until now.

Another concurrent and scary step is sending each chapter out to a different Russian teacher who is not yet my best buddy, though some are becoming my idols as I speak, given their willingness to help. If you’re a Russian teacher and can help run a short chapter past a group of students, please connect!

And finally, I’m working on the glossary, even though I fear it will require a complete revamping if we change much. This is the most tedious task of all, given that every different form of every word must be defined, and any set phrases that will help also go in. Mike suggested reading the book, word by word, and constructing the glossary as I go, so that the meanings fit what I’ve written, rather than trying to make a mini dictionary.

The Russian words are bolded and in 14 point Cyrillic font. The meanings are in 12 point, not bold, but italic Roman font. Did I say “tedious” already? I would never have known to format this way, nor would I have known much of the other priceless information Mike has shared. Even if I were writing a book in English, I would probably sign up for one of his writing groups.

If I ever When I get through these steps, I will start working on illustrations. That’s a whole ‘nother ball of wax. Wish me patience – and many Russian teachers!

Tandem teaching

I always come away from my OLÉ! classes with a big grin on my face. OLÉ! stands for Opportunities in Lifelong Education (for Alaskans 50 and older). OLÉ! is the brainchild of a local wonder woman educator, and there are courses of every possible type: from economics to languages, from philosophy to physics of breathing. (I’m personally taking a class featuring eight Alaskan writers.) I get to teach Russian to a group of interested, educated adults who want to learn, without grades or curriculum requirements. Nirvana.

My students are the easiest group I could have. Even Zoom is not an issue. I get to practice new ideas on them, and that is where this semester’s classes started: with an experiment in tandem teaching.

My colleague and I were both part of a summer French class (on Zoom), in which she was an intermediate and I a rank beginner. I was stunned that she and I could both participate, that we both felt challenged, and that we both understood everything that went on. I asked her whether she’d be willing to co-teach the OLÉ! class, and she was eager to join me.

I wish that every language teacher could have the experience of tandem teaching. As one of the teachers who helped us practice said, having two brains makes everything easy. That uneasy feeling of being on the edge of a story cliff is relieved, because the teachers can talk about the development of the story, can throw ideas back and forth, and both can check the group’s understanding. The extra ingredient that was part of the French class — a third teacher, who provided translations of new words in the chat — is fulfilled by an advanced student. Chat is working beautifully in our class.

There may soon be a Russian tandem class available outside OLÉ!, but in the meantime, I would encourage pairs of language teachers who have classes at the same time, whether the groups are the same level or not, and whether the teachers are even in the same school or not, to experiment with tandem teaching. Ask a high-level student to chat out new structures, and restrict other student chat to important questions or responses about the story. You will love it. I promise.