Tag Archives: Three-ring circus

TCI Maine

If you are a CI-minded teacher and want to feel part of a community immediately, sign up the minute that registration for TCI Maine goes live in March. It has an iron-clad registration limit. And, like our Lost Lake race in Alaska, it fills up fast. Skip and Beth Crosby should be in charge of the world.

For a person who missed all her connecting flights today, I am amazingly happy.*

A few TCI Maine highlights:

  1. Amy Vander Deen addressed an elephant in the room and talked about the true nuts and bolts of classroom management. If the key techniques for everything CI are (but are not limited to) establishing meaning, going slowly, pointing and pausing, checking comprehension, and limiting vocabulary, the key techniques for classroom management start with establishing and practicing routines and expectations, then insisting that students fulfill those expectations. Amy shared her early struggles with classroom management and how she realized that we tend to shut down or put up walls when the discussion arises. She included a mention of the system my new school uses (Responsive Classroom), and there are others that also provide the tools and techniques teachers need. She suggested The First Six Weeks of School, and read us some of Jim Tripp’s words on sticking to expectations–being consistent. Susie Gross’s words ring in my ears: Discipline Precedes Instruction.
  2. Rachelle Adams and Anna Gilcher led us through the creation of Cultural Jewels. Look at Elevate Education for more info. I am going to suggest Cultural Jewels for a staff/faculty meeting. I felt many connections with the four formerly unknown-to-me teachers after that experience, as well as having the idea that I would now “get” them better even if I had known them in advance. I would like to feel the same way about teachers at my new school. I am also re-inspired to try the activity with my students.
  3. Three-ring circus with Dustin (YIKES! Last name?) doing a great job of coaching. He was very sincere and thorough, and I liked his addition of asking the teacher what her concerns were before she started.We discussed it in advance, which set the teacher at ease, then she demoed, and it was fabulous! She started with just one student (eating), and had a conversation with the others about eating, then brought a second student on to sleep, having first found out whether anyone was very tired. She used Laurie Clarcq’s idea of a pause button during the circus. (I realized telling students we would do a 3-ring circus is probably why, in my first year of trying it, the room turned into a virtual circus.) When Annie Ewing asked about her motivation for the three verbs, including “play,” the teacher who demonstrated said that she had chosen her three verbs so that she could talk about weekends. It didn’t feel at all like a circus. It felt like a perfect way to establish meaning, to provide a brain break, and to have some fun.
  4. I’m quite sure no teaching conference has ever had better food. As examples of how overboard they went in allowing for preferences, picky me enjoyed oven-roasted autumn veggies and gluten-free chocolate chip cookies yesterday.

*it may be the fact that United Airlines put me up in a fancy hotel…and that I am not going to miss a day of school after all…and that Lois and Michaela shared their google notes on the parts of Amy’s presentation that I missed while being a doofus and while presenting…and that I’m still having all those feelings of having been with a welcoming group of people who also care passionately about finding effective, just, and community-building ways to help students acquire language. Maine TCI is close to my heart.

Rachelle and Anna guide the group